Large Dog Kennel Plan

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Large Dog Kennel Plan

Dog kennel
Most of the dogs I know seem to live in the lap of luxury, and would really look askance at something as basic as a kennel, so with this in mind I’ve gone a combination of summer house and hideaway in the hope that you’ll be able to convince that extra member of the family to occasionally grace it with their presence.
Obviously the notion of one size fits all is totally inappropriate where dogs are concerned, and this kennel is aimed at the medium to large dog, a labrador for example. The design allows for a sitting/lying area as well as the kennel proper, with the dual advantage of sheltering your dog from heat or rain, and protecting the entrance to the kennel fom the elements. The floor is raised off the ground to keep it dry.
Construction is based around corner posts joined front and back by bottom rails and rafters, and at the sides by pairs of rails top and bottom. The joints on the rails and posts are barefaced mortice and tenons, which are simple to cut and allow you line up the vertical cladding plane a bit more easily. I would initially set out (but don’t fix) the front and back frames as matching pairs, cutting the posts to length with the tops angled at 36 degrees, and notched to recieve the rafters, which should also be cut to size and notched at the top for the ridge. Include the front and back divider uprights in this process, as cutting them later will be tricky, and don’t forget to cut mortices at the top for the divider top rail
Next, mark and cut the mortices on the posts, and then cut the side rails and tenon the ends. Assemble and fix the side rails into the posts with screws and then join them front and back with the lower long rails to form your outer frame. The next step is to add the floor, which has to be notched on all four corners around the posts, and will be easier to position as long as there is still a bit of flexibility in the frame, Now comes the tricky bit of fitting the rafters, which will just wave around until you start adding the divider uprights, and this might be easier with two pairs of hands. The final bit of the frame is the divider top rail, and as this slots into mortices front and back, don’t fix the ridge in place until this is fitted, and you should be able to spring it in place.
Next, I would cut and fix your cladding of choice. I have shown vertical T and G, but you could use a sheet material. The outer side is just fixed top and bottom to the rails, but the divider side with the kennel entrance needs battens fixed at floor level and around the side and top of the entrance to stiffen it. As the cladding on this side hangs from the top divider rail, a good fixing to the floor along the length will also help to stop the floor sagging at all over time. The front and back cladding is fixed at the top to the inner faces of the rafters, and then to the outer faces of the bottom rails, and gives you a bit of flexibility with fitting. You may want to reinforce the vertical ends with small battens run up the posts and divider verticals.
Now cut and fix your roof panels to the frame. I have shown the top edges of the panels bevelled, but you may not think this is needed, especially as you might want to add roofing felt on top to keep the kennel a bit drier. One variation would be to hinge the panel on the kennel side to allow top access to the sleeping area. If you do this, make sure you fix the cladding really well along the top edges to add strength to the frame, and add brackets under the fixed roof panel to the ridge, as this will need stiffening for the hinges required. Now just add a bowl of water in a strategic location to complete the job.

File Name: WL-06 LARGE DOG KENNEL.pdf
File Size: 293.3 KB
File Type: application/pdf
Created User: LineMine Drawings
Created Date: 08-05-2018
Last Updated Date: 08-05-2018

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